Thursday, September 3, 2009

A Post-- I Hope Won't Die In Research

I am working on gaining info, for a post I've wanted to do for some time on Buster Parker. Not a lot is known, regarding this seemingly illusive and perhaps misunderstood figure from B&C History. I'm hoping to gain important knowledge from some inside sources about Buster. However it may be true, that some insiders who've been so helpful in the past-- have now reached their limit, in helping impart B&C knowledge.

Someone recently commented on another B&C forum, that it's fun to surmise for
example, with regard to Bonnie being a prostitute-- as claimed erroneously by some less than diligent author. Well for some it may be fun to debate-- but I can tell you, this kind of thing may have taken it's toll, on some particularly close to B&C History. And I can't say I blame them. When things are so errantly stated and by association get personal, people need to "think" -- and not let idle gossip grab the wheel, and steer them off the road aimed at historical truth and common courtesy.


I can only hope, one person in particular I've politely asked for assistance in regards to my doing a respectful article on Buster, and who's always been so nice to so many of us, hasn't shut down-- in being so disgusted with the bad elements of the B&C experience-- that perhaps now enough is enough. For such a genuinely nice person, that would truly be a shame. So for those who say the "sordid" rumors are somehow in fun, or think I spend too much time harping on them-- I can tell you, some might disagree.

By the way, I would think concerning some of this-- in March I suggested to Jeff Guinn, I thought it would be the right thing to do, for him to issue an apology and retraction-- to Bonnie's niece concerning the Bonnie prostitution claim-- and also an apology and retraction to L. J. "Boots" Hinton, concerning a nationally published review of Guinn's book-- which included a harmful misquote. But I suppose in my heart I long for a different time, when honor meant something-- and hurting others (even if unintentional) wasn't so guiltless.

11 comments:

t o m said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
A. Winston Woodward said...

Suggestion noted-- "thank you". I have changed my phrase to "fun to debate". However in clarifying that point, I still believe I have the intent correct. My position is-- it seems so many think it's fun, interesting or whatever, to dig into these completely unfounded rumors and bandy them about-- without thinking of those who live, who can be hurt by them.

I feel it's a shame, so many enjoy the gossip and search it out-- as noted by the many who key into this blog searching for the dirt, without perhaps thinking more-- and lusting less. My sincere thanks, to all who are here or anywhere-- for B&C "History".

Anonymous said...

My family became poor in time for my adolescence, and I was growing up in a very affluent area. I can tell you that some people made assumptions that us poorer girls were easy and low-minded. It never occurred to them that I might also be aspiring to college, a Master's, and professional achievement and respectability. All of which I attained. Bonnie did show a familiarity with the criminal element, but nothing she could not have picked up innocently from growing up in disreputable West Dallas of the time, and from detective magazines. The writing in popular rags back then could be a little lurid. Just like I know about meth users, without ever having taken an illegal drug myself. Just my 2 cents.

Nicole said...

In continuation from the last post we discussed, I found a pertinient quote in "Fugitives" that was attributed to Mrs. Parker which I think pretty much sums up this situation: "...truth is never so interesting as a good, wind blown yarn, made up out of whole cloth."

It seems as if you are picking up the torch searching for the "truths." Good hunting and I agree with Tom that if all we can to is pass information to future generations it is imperitive to continue!

Leesee said...

The careless and hurtful speculations in Guinn's book have bothered me from the moment I read the book several months ago, and I recall posting comments to that effect on other boards. I too feel badly for the families of B&C -- not only do they have to content with the truth as they know it, but also the idle and sometimes cruel gossip from virtual strangers. As for Buster Parker, I agree he seems to be a misunderstood and mysterious figure. It would be wonderful to learn more about who he was and to place his story within the context of his younger sister's. Thanks for this site, by the way. You may not always be able to generate the level and scope of discussion that you seek, but it has been an interesting and informative place to visit.

Leesee said...

Oops! Sorry for the typos in my previous post.

Anonymous said...

I'd love to know more about Buster too. It strikes me as to how many people connected with this story died at what we would consider young ages. When I was a kid, it was considered normal to die in ones upper 60s to mid 70s. Now the life expentancy for someone of my gender and ethnicity is in the early 80s. I wonder if death in ones 50s was considered normal back then, or if stress took its toll, or growing up poor, or what? - Barb

Russ1934 said...

Maybe somewhere in Louisiana on those dates, perhaps? Hmmmmmmmm!?

t o m said...
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Russ1934 said...

Thanks for that insight, Tommy. Perhaps I was being a little presumptuous in the post I made. I love a good mystery too, and sometimes have this slightly sarcastic side to me that comes out when I make statements about something that I also wonder about. Your suggestion that this person write a book, I think, if it came out the way that it should, and not be loaded with half truths and bull****, would be looked forward to by everyone, and could clear up a lot of mystery concerning Buster. Let's keep our fingers crossed that maybe this person won't withdraw completely.

Anonymous said...

To me, Buster seemed to take the same course as Jack Barrow, keeping his distance and raising a family. That's the impression I got. The mothers and younger siblings got dragged into it more, and this was reflected at the harboring trial.